Court: Trinity can move forward with 280 hospital

The Alabama Court of Civil Appeals ruled that Montgomery District Judge Jimmy Pool erred in his ruling, which blocked the hospital's certificate of need allowing the hospital to relocate to Highway 280.

Police: Teens robbed at Irondale hotel party

Irondale police are searching for at least one suspect they say robbed several teens and pistol whipped two of them at a high school party last weekend.

Judge to have last word over Walker County strip mine planned near water works source

The Water Works has used the Mulberry intake since around 1989 to provide water to nearly 200,000 customers west of Interstate 65, including Birmingham, Homewood, Vestavia Hills, Warrior and Hoover.


shepherd-bend-mine-sitejpg-1e543b059de09dd7.jpg Map of the 1,773 acre Shepherd Bend Mine as described in its ADEM permit. The permit granted by the Alabama Surface Mining Commission covers an initial 286 acres. 

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama — Three days of hearings are over and the fate of a proposed Walker County mining operation near a Birmingham Water Works intake now rests with an administrative law judge.


The Water Works is appealing state permission to allow Shepherd Bend LLC, a company owned by Drummond Coal, to begin coal mining at the Shepherd Bend Mine along 1,773 acres on the Mulberry Fork of the Black Warrior River within 800 feet of a water intake.


The hearing in Walker County ended this afternoon.


The Water Works argues that the permission from the Alabama Surface Mining Commission along with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management places the water supply in jeopardy, specifically risking contamination of surface and ground water and runoff from the mining site.


“A key issue is, will Shepherd Bend Mine unearth or dig up metals and materials such as iron, manganese, mercury and other heavy metals that could be discharged in the river and negatively impact Birmingham Water Works Board operations,” said Water Works General Manager Mac Underwood. “The Birmingham Water Works Board is appealing this mine to ensure that it can continue to use its Mulberry intake to serve its customers now and for many years to come.”


On the other side, mine supporters have said the river would be protected by a 50-foot buffer and sediment ponds that would allow pollutants to settle before water is released into the river. In addition, supporters cite about 100 new jobs paying about $6 million a year and $4.5 million in benefits, plus millions in taxes and fees.


The Water Works has used the Mulberry intake since around 1989 to provide water to nearly 200,000 customers west of Interstate 65, including Birmingham, Homewood, Vestavia Hills, Warrior and Hoover.


Both parties will now submit written briefs to the judge before he issues a decision.


In addition the Shepherd Bend site, the Water Works Thursday launched an appeal to another nearby mining operation. Reed Minerals plans to conduct surface mining on about 178 acres along the banks of the Mulberry Fork.

Game Plan: What to Watch This Week

The last month of the year is about to begin and with it will come a slew of quarterly reports and other key data. What will Cramer be watching?

ASU Board delays Silver action on news of mother’s death; ok’s audit, interim president

The Alabama State Board of Trustees met at 10am Friday to address issues surrounding the recent executive committee's decision to put ASU President Dr. Joseph Silver on paid administrative leave.

Join Twitter chat Monday on removing barriers for people with disabilities

Join a live national Twitter Town Hall on removing barriers for people with disabilities Monday between 2 p.m. and 2 p.m. (CST). Join the Twitter chat by following hashtag: #IDPDchat Lakeshore Foundation, UAB School of Health Professions, and The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) will be participating in the event sponsored by CDC's Division of…


Lakeshore Foundation.JPG

Wounded veterans at a Lakeshore Foundation camp. (File)


Join a live national Twitter Town Hall on removing barriers for people with disabilities Monday between 2 p.m. and 2 p.m. (CST).

Join the Twitter chat by following hashtag: #IDPDchat

Lakeshore Foundation, UAB School of Health Professions, and The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) will be participating in the event sponsored by CDC’s Division of Human Development and Disability (DHDD) at the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).

“We are excited about working with the CDC on this international event,” said Lakeshore Foundation spokesman Damian Veazey.

The chat is part of a focus on removing barriers to health care access commemorating International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

Join Twitter chat Monday on removing barriers for people with disabilities

Join a live national Twitter Town Hall on removing barriers for people with disabilities Monday between 2 p.m. and 2 p.m. (CST). Join the Twitter chat by following hashtag: #IDPDchat Lakeshore Foundation, UAB School of Health Professions, and The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) will be participating in the event sponsored by CDC's Division of…


Lakeshore Foundation.JPG

Wounded veterans at a Lakeshore Foundation camp. (File)


Join a live national Twitter Town Hall on removing barriers for people with disabilities Monday between 2 p.m. and 2 p.m. (CST).

Join the Twitter chat by following hashtag: #IDPDchat

Lakeshore Foundation, UAB School of Health Professions, and The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) will be participating in the event sponsored by CDC’s Division of Human Development and Disability (DHDD) at the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).

“We are excited about working with the CDC on this international event,” said Lakeshore Foundation spokesman Damian Veazey.

The chat is part of a focus on removing barriers to health care access commemorating International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

Man wanted for questioning in Cherokee County slaying captured in Tennessee

Vennie Leroy Keaton was taken into custody about 10:30 a.m.


chsuspect.jpg

Vennie Leroy Keaton 

A man sought in connection with the slaying of a woman found on the campus of an Alabama community college this week was captured today.

Members of the U.S. Marshals Gulf Coast Regional Fugitive Task Force took Vennie Leroy Keaton, 37, into custody today in Cookeville, Tenn. Keaton is being held in Tennessee, but a Cherokee County deputy is en route to return him back to Alabama this evening.

Cherokee County authorities on Thursday announced they were searching for Keaton as a person of interest in the slaying of Melissa Leann Hudgins. Hudgins’ body was discovered Wednesday on the campus of Gadsden State Community College in Cherokee County.

Hudgins and Keaton both worked for a cleaning company that had a contract with the campus. Keaton has not been charged with any crime related to Hudgins death, but is charged with the theft of her car. Authorities said Keaton had lived in Centre for only 16 days prior to Hudgins’ death.

Hudgins’ body was discovered about 9 a.m. Wednesday in a mechanical room underneath the bleachers in the school’s arena. The campus is on Cedar Bluff Road in Centre.

Authorities have not said how she was killed, but said her death was a homicide. Later Wednesday, Hudgins vehicle was found abandoned on the side of the road in Tennessee, and was recovered by the Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Office. The vehicle was since taken back to Cherokee County and examined by forensic investigators with the Calhoun-Cleburne County Violent Crimes Task Force.

Keaton was also wanted on theft charges in Cherokee County and in Tennessee. “We’re just glad that he is in custody,” said Cherokee County Sheriff Jeff Shaver, “and nobody else has to worry about him.”

Follow @RobinsonCarol
Follow @Birmingham_News